Intermountain Allergy & Asthma

Intermountain Allergy & Asthma has a long standing reputation of excellence in serving our Wasatch Front communities for well over 30 years. Our conveniently located offices in Draper and Ogden provide a wide range of Allergy and Immunology services provided by American Board of Allergy and Immunology certified physicians specializing in allergy and asthma care.

Why It Is Important To Choose A Board-Certified Physician?

Extensive training is required to become a board-certified physician. To obtain board certification in Allergy and Immunology, a physician must graduate from an accredited medical school, complete a year-long internship, and then a three year residency in internal medicine or pediatrics. Upon completing a residency program, the physician must complete a two or three year fellowship in Allergy and Immunology training.

Our board certified physicians specialize in relief from the following:

  • Allergies:
    • Seasonal Allergies
    • Food Allergies
    • Pet Allergies
    • Medication Allergies
  • Asthma:
    • Chronic & Episodic Asthma
    • Exercise-Induced Asthma
  • Eczema (Dermatitis)
  • Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE)
  • Hives
  • Insect Bites & Stings
  • Sinusitis

What We Do

Approximately 20% of Americans suffer from allergies, making it the sixth most prevalent condition in the country. Allergy is one of the most pervasive and debilitating diseases affecting the workplace today. Allergies account for approximately 10% of all lost workdays in this country. The cost of lost workdays and impaired productivity is over $11 billion per year.

Allergies frequently trigger asthma. Asthma is a frequent cause for hospital admission for children and it is one of the leading childhood diseases causing significant lost time from school. On average, asthmatic children miss twice as many school days as other children. Asthma and allergies lead the list of causes for absence from work and the resulting loss of production.

Despite good medications available for asthma, and improved understanding of the disease, asthma-related symptoms and death are still a significant problem. Asthma-related healthcare costs remain high.

Past studies have shown that referral to a Board Certified Allergist for aggressive management of the disease results in:

  • Fewer hospitalizations
  • Shorter hospital stays
  • Fewer return visits to the hospital
  • Fewer emergency room visits
  • Reduction in hospitalization cost
  • Fewer sick care office visits
  • Less time lost from work and school

What Is Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy, sometimes referred to as desensitization, is a series of injections to lessen your sensitivity to those things to which you are allergic. These injections are gradually increased in amount as well as strength until you become more tolerant of those inhaled substances which are causing the problems. Medications may still be needed to relieve symptoms during the desensitization process.

How Long Must I Be On Injections?

The treatment period varies from patient to patient and is normally 3-1/2 to 5 years and continues year-round. During most of this time the shots are given once a month.

Are Allergy Injections Safe?

Because you are receiving injections of substances to which you are allergic, it is possible for a systemic reaction to occur. Systemic reactions are uncommon, but serious and require immediate attention. These reactions most frequently occur within a few minutes after your injection. Therefore, you must wait in the clinic 30 minutes (or longer if you wish) following an allergy injection to allow for prompt and appropriate treatment of any reaction that might occur.

Are Reactions Common?

No. Most allergy injections are safe and free from reactions.

What Can I Do To Minimize Reactions?

  1. Take an antihistamine before getting your injection(s).
  2. Wait in the clinic 30 minutes following each allergy injection.
  3. Let the medical assistant know:
    • how well you tolerated your last shot
    • about any new drugs you are taking
    • if you are having asthma symptoms
    • if you are ill or have a fever
    • if you are pregnant
  4. Avoid strenuous exercise for one hour before or two hours following your injection.

How Often Must I Get My Injections?

For the first few months injections are given once or twice a week and then less frequently as the immunotherapy progresses. Eventually injections are given monthly.

Should I Get An Injection If I’m Sick?

No. Injections will not be given if you are significantly ill, especially if you have a fever or have asthma symptoms. If the illness is related to your allergies, please call the doctor for advice. Be sure the allergist and medical assistant are told about any changes in your medical condition and any new medications you are taking.

Where Do I Get My Injections?

We have offices in Draper and Ogden. You can get your injections at the location most convenient for you. You do not need an appointment. If neither the Draper nor Ogden offices are convenient, you may be able to receive the injections in your primary care doctors’ office (this is done quite frequently).

What is food allergy?

A food allergy is any adverse reaction to an otherwise harmless food or food component that involves a portion of the body’s immune system. Although allergic reactions can occur virtually to any food, most reactions are caused by a limited number of foods: milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, soy, wheat, peanuts, and tree nuts.

What are the symptoms?

The most common symptoms involve the skin or gastrointestinal tract, beginning with swelling or itching of the lips, mouth and/or throat. When an offending food enters the stomach, nausea, vomiting, cramping and diarrhea may occur. Itching, eczema, hives, and redness of the skin may also occur. Some people may experience sneezing, a runny nose, shortness of breath, or asthma. Anaphylaxis is a rare but life-threatening condition. Symptoms of anaphylaxis include severe itching, hives, swelling of the throat, breathing problems, unconsciousness, and even death.

What is food intolerance?

Adverse reactions to foods that do not involve the immune system are known as “food intolerances.” One of the most common may be the result of the body’s inability to digest sugars in food such as milk sugar (lactose) intolerance. Other examples are food poisoning, metabolic reactions to food, reactions to drug-like chemicals in foods (e.g. caffeine) and adverse reactions due to chemicals added to food.

How can a food allergy be diagnosed?

If a food allergy is suspected, a board certified allergist should be able to help. Diagnosing a food allergy begins with a detailed medical history to identify the suspected food. The physician may suggest keeping a diary of foods eaten and symptoms that occur. Elimination diets are sometimes used to help diagnose and treat food allergies. Skin testing may also be useful. The physician might conduct a food challenge where the person eats portions of the suspected food under medical supervision.

Treatment of food allergy

Once the diagnosis of food allergy is confirmed, the allergist can discuss treatment options with you. For many people, the best option is still to simply avoid the offending food.

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